Missouri License Renewal COVID-19 Update and FAQs

When do I need to renew my Missouri real estate license?

Due to COVID-19, Missouri has issued the following license renewal deadline extensions:

  • The current 2020 Broker renewal and CE deadlines have been extended until August 31, 2020.
  • The current 2020 Salesperson renewal and CE deadlines have been extended until October 31, 2020. The renewal period for Salesperson licenses begins August 1, 2020 and will run through October 31, 2020.

Click here for more detailed COVID-19 policy update information.

What are my Missouri real estate continuing education requirements?

Salespersons and Brokers in Missouri are required to complete 12 hours of continuing education each two-year license cycle. At least three hours are required to be in a core topic (MO Laws, Broker Supervision and Escrow Account Management, Fair Housing, Property Management, Commercial Brokerage or Agency and Brokerage Relationships).

Are your courses approved by the Missouri Real Estate Commission?

Yes! Our school ID is 30300. Course approval numbers are included in the course title.

Do you report my continuing education to the Missouri Real Estate Commission?

Yes! We will report your continuing education course completion to the Missouri Real Estate Commission within 10 days. It can take 24-48 hours for the completed course to be reflected in your online profile.

How long do I have to complete my courses after I purchase them?

Individual courses are available for six months from the date of purchase. The purchase of a package will give you access to the course work for the full length of your licensing cycle (2 years).

Do I have to complete courses all at one time?

No! You do not have to complete each course in one sitting. Your courses are available to you from any internet enabled device, and our system will keep track of where you start and stop.

Our courses are usually broken into 20-25 minutes intervals, which will make it easy for you to complete your course when it’s convenient for you!

How do I renew my Missouri real estate license?

Missouri Real Estate Commission will mail out a paper renewal notice that will include your license number and PIN. This is usually sent mid to late April for brokers and mid to late July for Salespersons. Once you have that information you will be able to renew your license online.

How much does it cost to renew my Missouri real estate license?

$50 | Broker (Active or inactive)

$40 | Salesperson (Active or inactive)

$150 | Non-Resident Broker (Active or inactive)

$100 | Non-Resident Salesperson (Active or inactive)

Fees Schedule

I missed the due date for my Missouri real estate license renewal, can I still renew?

Yes, however, your license will not be considered active, and you will not be able to engage in any real estate activity until your license is reinstated to active status. Late renewals are subject to a $50 per month or partial month penalty, up to a $200 maximum. Late renewals cannot be submitted online.

Do I have to complete any continuing education if my Missouri real estate license is inactive?

No. Continuing education is not required while on inactive status, however, before the licensee can activate the license, completion of the 24-hour Missouri Real Estate Practice Course is required.

Does Missouri have reciprocity with other states?

Yes, Missouri does have provisions for individuals who hold a real estate license in another state/jurisdiction. Click here for more information.

 


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New York Bill Aims to Stop Real Estate Agent Discrimination

Earlier this year, New York issued 25 subpoenas to real estate agents and companies in response to a Newsday investigation into housing discrimination. The investigation revealed that Long Island real estate agents discriminated 19% of the time against Asians, 39% of the time against Hispanics, and 49% of the time against Blacks.

Now, in response to Newsday’s story, the New York State Senate just passed Bill S6874A. If it reaches the Governor’s desk and becomes law, it gives the Department of State the authority to “fine, suspend or revoke the license of a real estate agent or broker who commits a violation of Article 15 of the Executive Law in his or her capacity as an agent or broker.”

Article 15 of the Executive Law is known as the New York State Human Rights Law which prohibits housing discrimination. As of now, real estate agents or brokers in New York are not subject to Article 15, and cannot be punished by the state for discriminatory practices. This new bill aims to change that.

“Housing discrimination and predatory practices will not be tolerated in New York,” Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins said. “By advancing this legislation, the Senate Majority is sending a clear message that you will be held accountable for engaging in unfair, discriminatory, and racist housing practices.”

To ensure you never unintentionally discriminate against any of your clients, check out last month’s blog and learn how to test yourself for possible hidden biases. Senator Jim Gaughran, one of the bill’s sponsors,said “public officials must speak out against racism and end segregation and discrimination in our society, once and for all.” We encourage all real estate professionals to adopt a similar mindset and work toward ending discrimination from within the industry.

 


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New Tool Makes Working with Socially Distant Clients Easier

Unfortunately, social distancing isn’t going away any time soon. As you continue to adjust your business practices to keep clients safe, there is a new tool releasing soon that can make it easier for you to sell homes remotely.

OneHome, revealed earlier this month by CoreLogic (a real estate market data and analytics provider) is a virtual collaboration portal that “facilitates seamless interaction between agents and their clients.” Instead of relying on multiple tools to remotely guide your client through the home buying process, OneHome aims to be a “one-stop-shop.” It includes a virtual marketplace where you can directly communicate with clients, AI-enabled home search results, and access to financing, insurance, and home improvement providers all in one portal.

Some unique features that are sure to make your job much easier are the “Planner” and “PropertyFit.” Planner is a guided checklist in the form of a timeline that explains every step of the home buying transaction process - minimizing any client confusion. PropertyFit is where OneHome flexes its AI-learning muscles. It uses the client’s previous home browsing data and shows them homes that are most likely to meet their needs.

OneHome is expected to be nationally available by the end of 2020. As the real estate market continues to shift along with the pandemic, how do you plan on using new technologies with your clients?

PropertyFit Preview Image

PropertyFit uses client search data to match them with homes that meet their needs. Image from corelogic.com

If you’re not already using social media or even drones to help grow your client base, check out our continuing education courses by choosing your state below.

 


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Testing Yourself for Hidden Biases in an Age of Housing Inequality

This month, the National Association of Realtors released a 53-minute training video centered around addressing and overcoming hidden biases in the real estate industry. With a tenet of our mission statement being to “grow our student’s knowledge base,” we’re encouraging real estate professionals in Michigan and all over the country to learn about and assess themselves for hidden biases.

A hidden (or implicit) bias is when our brains automatically (and often unconsciously) associate stereotypes with particular groups of people - which can cause us to treat those people differently. Before you watch the training video, try taking an Implicit Bias test to learn what your unconscious attitudes are. Considering your own hidden biases is an uncomfortable process, but a necessary one. Research shows that “despite people’s best intentions and conscious awareness, some biases can persist.”

Some examples of hidden bias statements gathered from real estate agents are:

  • “I am going to show you some homes in ‘your kind of neighborhood.’ ”
  • You don’t want to live in that neighborhood, you can afford to live over here where you’ll feel more comfortable.”

If you can’t watch the entire course right now, here’s one key takeaway:

Bias Override is a way to make sure that your behavior aligns with your values. Integrating this into your real estate practice means:

  • Developing protocols for how to provide all clients with equal treatment
  • Learning how to manage your mindset so your interpersonal interactions with clients are respectful and successful
  • Creating scripts for how to navigate conversations about subjects such as schools to make sure you are conveying the same information to each client

It’s important to ensure that all of your clients can obtain the exact housing they desire. In Michigan, studies show that housing inequality is still prevalent despite 1968’s Fair Housing Act. A 2016 survey found that in Metro Detroit, black applicants were twice as likely to be denied a home loan as white applicants. In Lansing, black applicants fare even worse with a denial rate three times higher than whites.

This week, join in the fight for housing equality by setting aside some time to recognize your own hidden biases and start taking steps to change your way of thinking.

 


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Love Wins in Real Estate

The LGBTQ+ community across the nation celebrated as the U.S Supreme Court ruled that existing federal law forbids job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation or transgender status. This is a major victory for advocates of gay rights. By formally recognizing LGBT individuals into federal anti-discrimination law, the Court effectively rejected the withholding of rights. The LGBTQ+ movement is determined to gain equality, and this ruling showcases the strides that have been made and the challenges we still face when it comes to discrimination in the U.S.

In a landmark 6-3 decision, the court ruled that employers can’t fire lesbian, gay, or transgender people simply for being who they are. The ruling says Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination based on race, religion, national origin, and sex applies to discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. The passing of this ruling and the many more to come will bring change to real estate and fair housing and allow real estate professionals to tap into a much broader demographic than ever before.

Members of the LGBTQ+ community will not have to cherry-pick which state they can live in to own a home and get fair mortgage rates. According to a poll from Iowa State University, same-sex couples were charged .02% to 0.2% more in interest rates, upfront fees, or both on their loans. While to the average eye it doesn’t seem like much, it can add up to hundreds or even thousands of dollars over a 30-year mortgage. That same report shows same-sex couples were 73% more likely to be denied a mortgage than straight couples with similar profiles. “It’s very sad that even in this day and age there’s still discrimination in the mortgage process after all the strides we’ve made," says Tim Hur, a previous diversity chair of the National Association of Realtors®. "Everyone should have the same opportunity to own a home. It doesn't matter if you're gay, lesbian, Asian, black, or Hispanic."

Modern communities are more diverse than ever so why the great divide? Lack of confidence may help explain why LGBTQ+ home ownership rates lag those of America overall. According to the survey, 54% of LGBTQ+ respondents owned homes, compared with the national home ownership rate of 63.8% (which is itself at the lowest point since 1993).

LGBTQ+ who rent, particularly Millennials, have their own concerns, however.

For a generation that many have been deemed “Generation Rent”, the survey said, of LGBT Millennials surveyed, 59% say they plan to have children in the future; having children being a potential motivator for purchasing a home. Housing discrimination is a whopping 73% of the survey's respondents’ strongest concerns, whether they wanted to buy or rent. Choosing where to live is the first step in the path to home ownership and immediately we see the importance of being in an accepting and welcoming community. As LGBTQ+ people move from renting to home buying, the right neighborhood remains vital. Unfortunately, the fear of discrimination also plays a massive role in the LGBTQ+ community with 46% of renters fearing it during their future home buying process.

“Recall that ‘We, the People’ were once white, property-owning men,” said Ruth Bader Ginsburg, U.S. Supreme Court Justice. “Native Americans were originally not part of ‘We, the People,’ nor were people held in human bondage, women, or newcomers to our shores. Today, ‘We, the People,’ has a marvelous diversity, wholly absent in the beginning.” We are the people. All of us. Together.

 

 


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Real Estate: Leading the Way to Economic Recovery

In the wake of a world wide pandemic and having to hit the restart button into the “new normal” we have found that the US economy is but a shadow of its former self. One bright spark in the universe of unknowns is the real estate industry. More and more U.S. states are re-opening for summer business. People will begin to go back to work and the financial landscape of the country will start to turn around.

The significant reasons why the housing market could be such a driving force is the impact it has on the local economy. Buying and selling a home goes far beyond personal growth and satisfaction, it supports our economy as a whole. According to a recent study by the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the average new home sale has a total economic impact of $88,416. Robert Dietz, Chief economist and senior VP for economics and housing policy of The National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) says: “Overall, the data lends evidence to the NAHB forecast that housing will be the leading sector in an eventual economic recovery.”

On a month to month basis a surge of delayed transactions can be processed as the country opens. Some people who would have, in the absence of the pandemic, closed in March, April and May are likely to close in June and July. Add to those closings the buyers who were likely to close in June or July, in the pandemic’s absence, and there is a surge above normal for summer months. According to experts, the economy will begin to recover in the second half of this year. In addition, CNBC notes: “Mortgage demand from home buyers shows unexpectedly strong and quick recovery…The quick recovery has surprised most forecasters.”

The most considerable challenge for real estate agents is not necessarily the market, but all the changes in how activities are conducted moving forward. The “new normal” for construction, remodeling and sales will result in many new or changed processes. Those who can quickly adjust, by reevaluating and tweaking procedures, will thrive. Those who are stuck with a “this is how I’ve always done it” mentality will find the “new normal” a difficult environment.

We are facing one of the greatest challenges of our lifetime rebuilding the American economy, and real estate and the housing market will play a monumental factor in how quickly we can jump-start our economy which may be sooner than we think.

 


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COVID-19 Brings Remote Notarization Changes to Colorado

Despite an improving market outlook, with new listings increasing by 53% compared to April and interest rates dropping, we’re all still in the middle of a pandemic. If you’re still working with clients who insist on doing things from the safety of their homes, an important bill concerning remote notarization recently passed in the Colorado General Assembly.

Since March 27, an executive order allowed for a temporary suspension of the notary’s personal appearance requirement. But recently, a new bill passed that both extended the remote notary ability to the end of the year and made it permanent starting on January 1st, 2022.

Unlike many other states who already allow remote notarization, Colorado is putting a specific emphasis on privacy. The new bill, “prohibits the use or sale of personal information of a remotely located individual by a remote notary and the provider of a remote notarization system…” So, you can assure your clients that their private information is safe if they choose to use a remote notary.

To make sure your industry knowledge keeps up with this ever changing world, sign up for our online Real Estate Continuing Education courses.

 


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Minnesota Real Estate Renewal FAQ

The June 30th renewal deadline for Minnesota real estate agents is fast approaching. Here is everything you need to know to renew your license!

What are my Minnesota real estate continuing education requirements?

Salespersons and Brokers in Minnesota are required to complete 15 hours of continuing education each year, for a total of 30 hours each licensing cycle. Included in that 15 hours per year, each licensee must complete the current year 3.75-hour required module.

When do I need to renew my Minnesota real estate license?

Salespersons and Brokers in Minnesota are required to renew their real estate license no later than June 30th of your expiration year.

Are your courses approved by Minnesota Department of Commerce?

Yes! Our provider number is 21027179. Course approval numbers are listed in the course title.

Do you report my continuing education to Minnesota Department of Commerce?

Yes. We will report your continuing education to the Minnesota Department of Commerce. Courses are usually submitted three times per week and can take 24-48 hours to be reflected in your online profile.

How long do I have to complete my courses after I purchase them?

Individual courses are available for six months from the date of purchase. The purchase of a package will give you access to the course work for the full length of your licensing cycle (2 years).

Do I have to complete the course at one time?

No! You do not have to complete each course in one sitting. Your courses are available to you from any internet enabled device, and our system will keep track of where you start and stop. Our courses are usually broken into 20-25 minutes intervals, which will make it easy for you to complete your course when it’s convenient for you!

How do I renew my Minnesota real estate license?

It is the Primary Broker’s responsibility to renew all of the licenses that are due for the renewal and associated with the real estate company before 4:30 PM Central Time on June 30th of the applicable renewal year. The mass renewal can be done online at www.pulseportal.com. Electronic renewal application, renewal documents, and payments must be received by the MN Department of Commerce before 4:30 PM Central Time on June 30th of the applicable renewal year.

How much does it cost to renew my Minnesota real estate license?

$60 | Salesperson
$120 | Broker or Limited Broker

I missed the due date for my Minnesota real estate license renewal, can I still renew?

No. If your license renewal deadline has passed you must complete all outstanding continuing education requirements and reapply for the license (via your broker) and pay new fees.

Do I have to complete any continuing education if my Minnesota real estate license is inactive?

Yes, all licensees in Minnesota are required to complete 15 hours of continuing education each year.


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Uncertainty in the Real Estate Market

Harry S. Truman once said “America was not built on fear. America was built on Courage, on Imagination, and Unbeatable Determination to do the job at hand.” That statement rings true for all of us once again. We all know, that the current situation makes it extremely difficult to project the future of the economy. Sam Khater, Chief Economist at Freddie Mac, says: “The uncertainty of the crisis means forecasts of economic activity are more unclear than usual.” Analysts normally look at economic data and compare it to previous slowdowns to create their projections. This situation, as we know, is anything but normal.

Analysts must incorporate data from three different sciences into their recovery equation:

  1. Business Science– How has the economy rebounded from similar slowdowns in the past?
  2. Health Science– When will COVID-19 be under control? Will there be another flareup of the virus this fall?
  3. Social Science– After businesses are fully operational, how long will it take American consumers to return to normal consumption patterns? (Ex: going to the movies, attending a sporting event, or flying).

The challenge of accurately combining the three sciences into a single projection has created uncertainty, and it has led to a wide range of opinions on the timing of the recovery. Quarterly growth contracted significantly in the world’s second-biggest economy – China – for the first time in 28 years, skyrocketing jobless numbers in the U.S., and warnings from OPEC that demand for oil will fall to a 30-year low, have many wondering if it really will be business as usual once the coronavirus pandemic is over. Sam Khater, Chief Economist at Freddie Mac still has hope stating, “We expect that most of the economic damage from the virus will be contained to the first half of the year. Going forward, we should see a recovery starting in the second half of 2020.”

Right now, the vast majority of economists and analysts believe a full recovery will take anywhere from 6-18 months. No one truly knows the exact timetable, but it will be coming.  A recent global poll shows that people have some serious doubts despite reassurances from many governments that we will see a quick recovery in the economy once the outbreak is under control. The majority of people in 10 out of the 15 countries surveyed say a quick economic recovery is unlikely once the lockdown from the pandemic is lifted, with this sentiment highest in hard-hit European countries.

The fear and uncertainty we feel right now are very real, and this is not going to be easy. We can, however, see strength in our current market through homeowner equity that has not been there in the past. That may be a bright spark to help us make it through. While some have expected more people to find themselves underwater, new research from Atom Data Solutions suggests U.S. homeowners are still four times more likely to be equity rich, than seriously underwater.

Many companies will be able to bounce back nicely. But yes, there will be some businesses that don’t survive the shutdowns. Other businesses might be operating at severely reduced capacity or will have taken on additional debt burdens and, therefore, won’t be able to bring back all of their prior workforces. Experts agree the pace of recovery, likely in the second half of the year, is uncertain because it depends on the extent of the damage in the first half such as the permanent loss of industry.

Bottom Line

“It is better to plan for the worst and be pleasantly surprised than to be caught unprepared.”

 


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3 Tips For Real Estate Professionals During COVID-19

COVID-19 has had a huge impact on the real estate market across the United States. With many states on lock down or encouraging social distancing, showing homes is increasingly difficult if not impossible. However, there is still a lot you can do to keep your business moving forward.

    1. Use Your Social Media to Foster Relationships
      People are spending more time on social media than ever. Use your social media to build relationships with potential customers and maintain your relationships with current customers.You want to keep your relationship active so you’re the real estate agent they think of when things go back to normal. Create posts that suit your market. Do your customers want COVID content or would they prefer a distraction?
    2. Improve Your Listings
      Just because many people cannot attend showings right now does not mean they aren’t interested in buying homes. Add as much information to your listings as possible. If you can, take additional photos and videos of your properties. Once your listing is filled out – post it to your social media!
    3. Get Your Education Out of the Way
      I know, nobody wants to think about taking classes right now, but you’re not going to want to take classes when business picks up. Most states require a lot of education to become a broker, now is the time to get that out of the way. Same goes for your continuing education--even if your deadline is a long way out, finish it now. You’ll thank yourself later when you can focus your time and effort on selling.

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